Cloud Foundry takes first steps into Azure

Preview available no, beta real soon now, then …. wake me up when it's live, okay?


Microsoft's promise to make Azure Cloud Foundry-friendly has become concrete. A bit.

The company's announced a “public preview of open source Cloud Foundry for Microsoft Azure”.

Cloud Foundry's availability on Azure is a medium-sized deal, as it means those who chose to develop on the newly open-sourced platform can now deploy their workloads to Azure in addition to several other clouds. For Microsoft, that means Azure will become more attractive to quite a few developers.

If you're one of them, don't get too excited just yet: the public preview announced on Saturday will be followed by a beta “in a few weeks”. After that, Microsoft will take whatever it can hoover up from GitHub and “upstream the code back to the community source tree in a few months prior to GA.”

In other words, to paraphrase former supermodel Rachel Hunter, “It won't happen overnight, but it will happen.” ®

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