Camgirls, crypto currency and beer: The Register tours the Dark Net

Jamie Bartlett guides us around the web’s dirty underbelly


Reg Lectures Very few of us, even at The Reg, have spent a year trawling the darkest corners of the internet, getting to know right wing agitators, cryptocurrency zealots, and Yorkshire’s leading Camgirl.

Jamie Bartlett did though, and he shared his experiences with a room full of Register readers at our Summer lecture on May 21.

He took us deep into three of the internet sub-cultures he details in his book The Dark Net. We won’t tell you which three, because that would spoil the surprise when you watch this excellent video of Jamie’s excellent talk.

What you won’t get is the hours worth of Q&A that followed the lecture, or the stimulating chat you always get when a few dozen Register readers come together in close proximity to a bar. For that, you need to get a ticket and rock up, in the flesh.

If that sounds like your idea of a good night out, there are still tickets available for our third Summer lecture, given by National Museum of Computing co-founder Kevin Murrell. Just click here.

And if you want to be kept up to date on all Register events, including some cracking lectures we’re planning for later this year, sign up for a Register account. ®


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