Silicon-happy ARM engorges its profits by a third – so its shares dip

Apple 'woes' push price around despite firm doing rather well


ARM posted bumper sales and profits for its second quarter results – yet shares at the Cambridge-based outfit were still dragged down by Apple's "disappointing" results.

Revenues at the mobile processor design biz rose 22 per cent to £228.5m for its second quarter, while pre-tax profits increased 32 per cent to £123.9m, compared with the same period last year.

The outfit also signed 54 processor licences for the three months, a "record" number.

Despite its bumper results, shares dropped 3.1 per cent on the back of Apple's results. Like many mobile device makers, Apple uses ARM's processor designs in its range of iThings.

Yesterday Apple posted a third-quarter profit of $10.67bn (£6.43bn), up 38 per cent year on year, from revenues of $49.6bn (£31.8bn).

But that wasn't enough to please unimpressed analysts wanting greater forecasts for the fourth quarter, with shares in the fruity firm subsequently dropping seven per cent.

Simon Segars, ARM chief exec, said a diverse range of companies chose to license ARM’s latest processors in the second quarter and physical IP for future product developments.

"ARM has been investing in advanced technology products for mobile devices, automotive applications and enterprise infrastructure, and in Q2 ARM signed licences for many of these new products. This licensing activity will help to grow the royalty revenue opportunity for years to come," he said.

Headcount rose by 230 from the start of the year to 3,524 full-time employees, mainly comprising engineers joining its processor R&D teams. ®

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