Apple, Google should give FBI every last drop of user information, says ex-HP CEO and wannabe US prez Carly Fiorina

Come back, Trump, all is forgiven


Former HP CEO and current presidential hopeful Carly Fiorina says Apple and Google should just hand user information over to government investigators.

Speaking Thursday at the Republican party's presidential debates, Fiorina said companies should be more willing to cooperate with requests from federal investigators to produce customer information.

"I do not believe that we need to wholesale destroy every American citizen's privacy in order to go after those that we know are suspect or are – are already a problem," Fiorina told the debate moderator.

"But yes, there is more collaboration required between private sector companies and the public sector."

Later in the debate, when asked specifically if Apple and Google should give the FBI unfettered access to their systems, Fiorina responded, "I absolutely would call on them to collaborate and cooperate, yes."

Both Apple and Google have drawn the ire of government investigators by resisting efforts to decrypt and hand over personal information.

Government agencies have argued that the access to data is critical for national security investigations, while privacy advocates have argued that investigators are infringing on civil rights and collecting far more data than required.

Fiorina sided with the feds, saying that the recent cyber attacks on government agencies from state-sponsored hackers could have been thwarted if private companies were more accommodating.

"We know that we could have detected and repelled some of these cyber attacks if that collaboration had been permitted," she said.

Considered a long shot to win the Republican presidential nomination, Fiorina was not among the 10 candidates picked to take part in the main debate, but was instead relegated to the early "undercard" debate. Analysts studying the debate ruled Fiorina among the "winners" in the event.

The former CEO, who oversaw HP's massive 2001 merger with Compaq and was booted from the job in 2005, has since embarked on a political career. In 2010, she ran unsuccessfully for one of California's two Senate positions. ®


Other stories you might like

  • Google has more reasons why it doesn't like antitrust law that affects Google
    It'll ruin Gmail, claims web ads giant

    Google has a fresh list of reasons why it opposes tech antitrust legislation making its way through Congress but, like others who've expressed discontent, the ad giant's complaints leave out mention of portions of the proposed law that address said gripes.

    The law bill in question is S.2992, the Senate version of the American Innovation and Choice Online Act (AICOA), which is closer than ever to getting votes in the House and Senate, which could see it advanced to President Biden's desk.

    AICOA prohibits tech companies above a certain size from favoring their own products and services over their competitors. It applies to businesses considered "critical trading partners," meaning the company controls access to a platform through which business users reach their customers. Google, Apple, Amazon, and Meta in one way or another seemingly fall under the scope of this US legislation. 

    Continue reading
  • Brave Search leaves beta, offers Goggles for filtering, personalizing results
    Freedom or echo chamber?

    Brave Software, maker of a privacy-oriented browser, on Wednesday said its surging search service has exited beta testing while its Goggles search personalization system has entered beta testing.

    Brave Search, which debuted a year ago, has received 2.5 billion search queries since then, apparently, and based on current monthly totals is expected to handle twice as many over the next year. The search service is available in the Brave browser and in other browsers by visiting search.brave.com.

    "Since launching one year ago, Brave Search has prioritized independence and innovation in order to give users the privacy they deserve," wrote Josep Pujol, chief of search at Brave. "The web is changing, and our incredible growth shows that there is demand for a new player that puts users first."

    Continue reading
  • If Twitter forgets your timeline preference, and you're using Safari, this is why
    Privacy through amnesia not ideal for remembering user choice

    Apple's Intelligent Tracking Protection (ITP) in Safari has implemented privacy through forgetfulness, and the result is that users of Twitter may have to remind Safari of their preferences.

    Apple's privacy technology has been designed to block third-party cookies in its Safari browser. But according to software developer Jeff Johnson, it keeps such a tight lid on browser-based storage that if the user hasn't visited Twitter for a week, ITP will delete user set preferences.

    So instead of seeing "Latest Tweets" – a chronological timeline – Safari users returning to Twitter after seven days can expect to see Twitter's algorithmically curated tweets under its "Home" setting.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022