Windows XP spotted on Royal Navy's spanking new aircraft carrier

Windows for Warships: Time for an upgrade, perhaps


The Royal Navy’s new aircraft carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth appears to be using Windows XP.

The ship is a year from completion, so there is plenty of time yet to bin it for a more up-to-date and secure version of the venerable operating system.

The Ministry of Defence is not returning our calls, but this could always be, as one reader says, “comedy wallpaper on a technician’s laptop...”

You can check out the BBC News report about the Queen Elizabeth here. The XP wallpaper makes its appearance at 1m 25s.

A hat tip to Reg readers Alec, James and James for the sighting. Keep those tips rolling in. ®

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