Scottish MP calls for drone-busting eagles

Impressed by Dutch anti-UAV squadron plan


A Scottish MP has suggested cops north of the border might consider the idea of drone-busting eagles, following recent Dutch trials of a winged anti-UAV operative.

Dunfermline and West MP Douglas Chapman, who sits on the Commons Defence Select Committee, described the rising numbers of drones as "a real risk to people", "a danger to those on the ground" and even "a risk to national security" in the wrong hands.

Accordingly, he'll raise the possibility of feathered interceptors with fellow Defence Select Committee members. He said: "Training eagles to bring drones down safely is something Police Scotland could look at. Their Dutch counterparts seem to be doing interesting work in this area, and I think it is something the force should consider."

The Netherlands' finest last week released video of their efforts to date, which confirm that an eagle can bring down a moderately sized quadcopter, although how it'd fare against the whirling props of mightier opposition is unclear.

The biggest drone threat to Scottish national security to date appears to be an inadvertent attack on the Wallace Monument in Stirling, which suffered a broken window last October after being hit by a UAV.

At the time, Inspector Cheryle Cowan advised pilots to "familiarise themselves with all the appropriate legislation so as to ensure they adhere to existing aviation laws and regulations, and be aware of the areas in our community where drone activity may pose a particular sensitivity".

The UK's Civil Aviation Authority guidelines for drone usage are right here. ®

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