Blighty cops nab Brit teen for 'hacking' CIA Brennan's AOL email

Thin Blue Line reaches over cyberspace


A 16-year-old Brit has been arrested for allegedly hacking the email account of CIA director John Brennan.

The teenager is accused of hacking Brennan's personal email account and releasing some 40 sensitive documents that were contained within including a 47-page security clearance application for the director's current role.

CNN reports the boy was arrested on counts of suspicion of conspiracy to commit unauthorised access to access computer material and was released on bail.

The hacker used public information on Brennan to con AOL into resetting the director's email account.

The gang calling itself "Crackas with Attitude" on Twitter found Brennan's mobile phone number and called Verizon masquerading as staff to obtain more information on the chief. They used that personal data to request a password reset for Brennan's AOL account.

Released documents were not highly classified and Brennan said he did not violate his security responsibilities by using the account.

The group over several months dropped information on Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson, National Intelligence Agency director James Clapper, and FBI director Mark Giuliano. ®

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