Full Linux-on-PS4 hits Github

Last piece of the jigsaw, bootable from USB


Ever since fail0verflow first told Chaos Computer Club Sony PS4 machines could be persuaded to run Linux, a fair amount of work has gone into replicating his demonstration.

The problem for other PS4 hackers: to avoid take-downs and other sueballs from Sony, fail0verflow published only a Linux-to-PS4 port, leaving the rest of the world to discover the specific exploit used.

That unleashed a widespread effort, not only to find the best exploit, but to turn it into something stable.

According to this piece at Wololo.net, Githubber kR105 has laid hands on the grail.

The information comes with no warranty from The Register, because Vulture South doesn't have a spare PS4 with firmware version 1.76 handy to experiment on.

However, this, Wololo writes, is not a demonstration video, it's a “fully operational dlclose exploit” (referring to the Webkit exploit widely believed to lie behind fail0ver's original disclosure).

The piece continues: “there were still issues on how the publicly available code was working, crashing as soon as the exploit was attempting to return to userland. kR105’s release fixes all of that, it includes root, sandbox escape and jailbreak”.

With the files provided by kR105, the PS4-1.76 will boot from its USB (the kernel image, bzImage, and the initial file system, initramfs.cpio.gz.

The kR105 readme continues: “From there you can setup the environment to run from an NFS share or from an external drive via USB (recommended) and boot a complete distro!”. ®

Similar topics


Other stories you might like

  • AsmREPL: Wing your way through x86-64 assembly language

    Assemblers unite

    Ruby developer and internet japester Aaron Patterson has published a REPL for 64-bit x86 assembly language, enabling interactive coding in the lowest-level language of all.

    REPL stands for "read-evaluate-print loop", and REPLs were first seen in Lisp development environments such as Lisp Machines. They allow incremental development: programmers can write code on the fly, entering expressions or blocks of code, having them evaluated – executed – immediately, and the results printed out. This was viable because of the way Lisp blurred the lines between interpreted and compiled languages; these days, they're a standard feature of most scripting languages.

    Patterson has previously offered ground-breaking developer productivity enhancements such as an analogue terminal bell and performance-enhancing firmware for the Stack Overflow keyboard. This only has Ctrl, C, and V keys for extra-easy copy-pasting, but Patterson's firmware removes the tedious need to hold control.

    Continue reading
  • Microsoft adds Buy Now, Pay Later financing option to Edge – and everyone hates it

    There's always Use Another Browser

    As the festive season approaches, Microsoft has decided to add "Buy Now, Pay Later" financing options to its Edge browser in the US.

    The feature turned up in recent weeks, first in beta and canary before it was made available "by default" to all users of Microsoft Edge version 96.

    The Buy Now Pay Later (BNPL) option pops up at the browser level (rather than on checkout at an ecommerce site) and permits users to split any purchase between $35 and $1,000 made via Edge into four instalments spread over six weeks.

    Continue reading
  • Visiting a booby-trapped webpage could give attackers code execution privileges on HP network printers

    Patches available for 150 affected products

    Tricking users into visiting a malicious webpage could allow malicious people to compromise 150 models of HP multi-function printers, according to F-Secure researchers.

    The Finland-headquartered infosec firm said it had found "exploitable" flaws in the HP printers that allowed attackers to "seize control of vulnerable devices, steal information, and further infiltrate networks in pursuit of other objectives such as stealing or changing other data" – and, inevitably, "spreading ransomware."

    "In all likelihood, a lot of companies are using these vulnerable devices," said F-Secure researchers Alexander Bolshev and Timo Hirvonen.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2021