36 idiots running SAP under attack after flubbing 2010 patch

US-CERT issues first-ever alert for SAP users, advising them to become competent


The United States Computer Emergency Readiness Team has taken the unusual step of enumerating just how many organisations have a particular problem, by calling out “36 organizations worldwide are affected by an SAP vulnerability … that was patched by SAP in 2010.”

You read that right: 2010.

US-CERT is relaying research conducted by Onapsis that says it found at least 36 organisations under active attack thanks to the flaw.

The problem is caused by the “Invoker Servlet”, a component of the NetWeaver Application Server Java systems (SAP Java platforms). Somehow, the dirty 36 have managed to either flub or ignore the patch for years. Onapsis says the flaw means “remote unauthenticated attackers” enjoy “full access to the affected SAP platforms, providing them with complete control of the business information and processes run by them, as well as potentially further access to connected SAP and non-SAP systems.”

Which is bad news, for two reasons. Firstly, some of the 36 vulnerable organisations are multinationals so may well have lots of data. Secondly, the security industry will doubtless read about this problem and shower us all with another round of “Your Business Can Be Hacked Out Of Existence” finger-wagging.

The fix is simple: apply the patch and make sure it works. Or disable the Invoker Servlet.

Both chores sound like child's play for an SAP shop.

US-CERT has nonetheless decided it needs to offer them a little guidance, as follows:

  • Scan systems for all known vulnerabilities, such as missing security patches and dangerous system configurations.
  • Identify and analyze the security settings of SAP interfaces between systems and applications to understand risks posed by these trust relationships.
  • Analyze systems for malicious or excessive user authorizations.
  • Monitor systems for indicators of compromise resulting from the exploitation of vulnerabilities.
  • Monitor systems for suspicious user behavior, including both privileged and non-privileged users.
  • Apply threat intelligence on new vulnerabilities to improve the security posture against advanced targeted attacks.
  • Define comprehensive security baselines for systems and continuously monitor for compliance violations and remediate detected deviations.

Again, not stuff you'd think an SAP shop would need to know. But which at least 36 clearly need some help to understand. ®

Similar topics


Other stories you might like

  • Makers of ad blockers and browser privacy extensions fear the end is near
    Overhaul of Chrome add-ons set for January, Google says it's for all our own good

    Special report Seven months from now, assuming all goes as planned, Google Chrome will drop support for its legacy extension platform, known as Manifest v2 (Mv2). This is significant if you use a browser extension to, for instance, filter out certain kinds of content and safeguard your privacy.

    Google's Chrome Web Store is supposed to stop accepting Mv2 extension submissions sometime this month. As of January 2023, Chrome will stop running extensions created using Mv2, with limited exceptions for enterprise versions of Chrome operating under corporate policy. And by June 2023, even enterprise versions of Chrome will prevent Mv2 extensions from running.

    The anticipated result will be fewer extensions and less innovation, according to several extension developers.

    Continue reading
  • Apple gets lawsuit over Meltdown and Spectre dismissed
    Judge finds security is not a central feature of iDevices

    A California District Court judge has dismissed a proposed class action complaint against Apple for allegedly selling iPhones and iPads containing Arm-based chips with known flaws.

    The lawsuit was initially filed on January 8, 2018, six days after The Register revealed the Intel CPU architecture vulnerabilities that would later come to be known as Meltdown and Spectre and would affect Arm and AMD chips, among others, to varying degrees.

    Amended in June, 2018 the complaint [PDF] charges that the Arm-based Apple processors in Cupertino's devices at the time suffered from a design defect that exposed sensitive data and that customers "paid more for their iDevices than they were worth because Apple knowingly omitted the defect."

    Continue reading
  • Threat and risk specialists signal post-COVID conference season is back on
    Well, we'll see in a week or so

    RSA Conference For the first time in over two years the streets of San Francisco have been filled by attendees at the RSA Conference and it seems that the days of physical cons are back on.

    The security conference trade has been more cautious than most when it comes to getting conferences back up to speed in the COVID years. Almost all cons were virtual with a very limited hybrid-conference season last year, including DEF CON, where masks were taken seriously. People still wanted to mingle and ShmooCon too went ahead, albeit later than usual in March.

    The RSA conference has been going for over 30 years and many security folks love going. There are usually some good talks, it's a chance to meet old friends, and certain pubs host meetups where more constructive work gets done on hard security ideas than a month or so of Zoom calls.

    Continue reading
  • US cyber chiefs: Moving to Shields Down isn't gonna happen
    Promises new alert notices but warn 'we can sometimes predict thunderstorms but not lightning strikes'

    RSA Conference A heightened state of defensive cyber security posture is the new normal, according to federal cyber security chiefs speaking at the RSA Conference on Tuesday. This requires greater transparency and threat intel sharing between the government and private sector, they added.

    "There'll never be a time when we don't defend ourselves –— especially in cyberspace," National Cyber Director Chris Inglis said, referencing an opinion piece that he and CISA director Jen Easterly published earlier this week that described CISA's Shields Up initiative as the new normal. 

    "Now, we all know that we can't sustain the highest level of alert for an extensive period of time, which is why we're thinking about, number one, what's that relationship that government needs to have with the private sector," Easterly said on the RSA Conference panel with Inglis and National Security Agency (NSA) cybersecurity director Rob Joyce.

    Continue reading
  • Feeling highly stressed about your job? You must be a CISO
    'The attack surface has expanded exponentially' during the work-from-home pandemic, says one

    Almost all cybersecurity professionals are stressed, and nearly half (46 percent) have considered leaving the industry altogether, according to a DeepInstinct survey.

    For its annual Voice of SecOps Report, the endpoint security biz commissioned a poll of 1,000 senior-level security professionals in the US, UK, Germany and France.

    It found that although 91 percent of those surveyed experience at least a low-degree of work-related stress, and almost half (46 percent) of those professionals claimed their stress levels had risen over the past 12 months, their root causes differed based on their jobs. While six percent of all professionals claim to be "highly stressed" due to their work, among CISOs, ITOs, CTOs and global IT strategy directors, the number climbs to 33 percent.

    Continue reading
  • World Economic Forum wants a global map of online crime
    Will cyber crimes shrug off Atlas Initiative? Objectively, yes

    RSA Conference An ambitious project spearheaded by the World Economic Forum (WEF) is working to develop a map of the cybercrime ecosystem using open source information.

    The Atlas initiative, whose contributors include Fortinet and Microsoft and other private-sector firms, involves mapping the relationships between criminal groups and their infrastructure with the end goal of helping both industry and the public sector — law enforcement and government agencies — disrupt these nefarious ecosystems.  

    This kind of visibility into the connections between the gang members can help security researchers identify vulnerabilities in the criminals' supply chain to develop better mitigation strategies and security controls for their customers. 

    Continue reading
  • Ukraine's secret cyber-defense that blunts Russian attacks: Excellent backups
    This is why Viasat attack – rated one of the biggest ever of its kind – had relatively little impact

    RSA Conference The Kremlin-backed cyberattack against satellite communications provider Viasat, which happened an hour before Russia invaded Ukraine, was "one of the biggest cyber events that we have seen, perhaps ever, and certainly in warfare," according to Dmitri Alperovitch, a co-founder and former CTO of CrowdStrike and chair of security-centric think tank Silverado Policy Accelerator.

    Alperovitch shared that opinion during a global threat briefing he delivered with Sandra Joyce, EVP of Mandiant Intelligence, at the RSA Conference on Tuesday.

    The two suggested that the primary purpose of the attack on satellite comms provider Viasat was to disrupt Ukrainian communications during the invasion, by wiping the modems' firmware remotely, it also disabled thousands of small-aperture terminals in Ukraine and across Europe. The attack therefore disrupted satellite connectivity for thousands, and disabled remote monitoring of 5,800 wind turbines in Germany.  

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022