US extradition of Silk Road suspect OK'd by Irish judge

Davis' lawyers concerned about his Aspergers Syndrome and depression


An Irish court has authorized the extradition to the US of a man accused of helping to administer the infamous Silk Road website.

Gary Davis, 27, of Kilpedder, Co Wicklow, has moved one step closer to a US trial on charges of conspiracy to distribute narcotics, computer hacking and conspiracy to commit money laundering. Mr Justice Paul McDermott rejected arguments against the extradition of Davis, who reportedly suffers from both depression and Asperger Syndrome. As well as health and human rights grounds, the arguments against extradition also involved rejected procedures and legal objections, the Irish Times reports.

The Irish High Court ruling is not the final say in the matter, which Team Davis is expected to appeal, UTV Ireland adds. Lawyers for Davis continue to argue that their client ought to be tried in Ireland, if anywhere.

The Silk Road, for around two years prior to its takedown by the FBI in October 2013, offered an online black market for all manner of illicit goods and services. Punters paid for drugs and other purchases using Bitcoin, the digital currency that offers at least a degree of anonymity.

Davis allegedly served as an administrator of the site under the handle "Libertas" between June 2013 and October 2013. His (fairly junior) role in Ross Ulbricht's Silk Road operation involved handling customer queries and catalogue items offered for sale through the underground sites. A US Department of Justice statement issued just after the closure of the Silk Road and explaining the charges against Davis can be found here. ®

Similar topics

Broader topics

Narrower topics


Other stories you might like

  • LGBTQ+ folks warned of dating app extortion scams
    Uncle Sam tells of crooks exploiting Pride Month

    The FTC is warning members of the LGBTQ+ community about online extortion via dating apps such as Grindr and Feeld.

    According to the American watchdog, a common scam involves a fraudster posing as a potential romantic partner on one of the apps. The cybercriminal sends explicit of a stranger photos while posing as them, and asks for similar ones in return from the mark. If the victim sends photos, the extortionist demands a payment – usually in the form of gift cards – or threatens to share the photos on the chat to the victim's family members, friends, or employer.

    Such sextortion scams have been going on for years in one form or another, even attempting to hit Reg hacks, and has led to suicides.

    Continue reading
  • Google: How we tackled this iPhone, Android spyware
    Watching people's every move and collecting their info – not on our watch, says web ads giant

    Spyware developed by Italian firm RCS Labs was used to target cellphones in Italy and Kazakhstan — in some cases with an assist from the victims' cellular network providers, according to Google's Threat Analysis Group (TAG).

    RCS Labs customers include law-enforcement agencies worldwide, according to the vendor's website. It's one of more than 30 outfits Google researchers are tracking that sell exploits or surveillance capabilities to government-backed groups. And we're told this particular spyware runs on both iOS and Android phones.

    We understand this particular campaign of espionage involving RCS's spyware was documented last week by Lookout, which dubbed the toolkit "Hermit." We're told it is potentially capable of spying on the victims' chat apps, camera and microphone, contacts book and calendars, browser, and clipboard, and beam that info back to base. It's said that Italian authorities have used this tool in tackling corruption cases, and the Kazakh government has had its hands on it, too.

    Continue reading
  • NSO claims 'more than 5' EU states use Pegasus spyware
    And it's like, what ... 12, 13,000 total targets a year max, exec says

    NSO Group told European lawmakers this week that "under 50" customers use its notorious Pegasus spyware, though these customers include "more than five" European Union member states.

    The surveillance-ware maker's General Counsel Chaim Gelfand refused to answer specific questions about the company's customers during a European Parliament committee meeting on Thursday. 

    Instead, he frequently repeated the company line that NSO exclusively sells its spyware to government agencies — not private companies or individuals — and only "for the purpose of preventing and investigating terrorism and other serious crimes."

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022