Red Hat relabels OpenShift Enterprise to Container Platform

Also tacks on update to version 3.3, you lucky people


Red Hat’s on-premises application serving software has been given a rename from OpenShift Enterprise to OpenShift Container Platform, at the same time adding a slew of enhancements to improve scalability and security.

OpenShift started out as Red Hat’s platform as a service (PaaS) offering for application development centred on its JBoss enterprise Java platform, but was refocused around Docker and Kubernetes with the rise in popularity of containers for deploying applications.

Now, OpenShift Container Platform 3.3 offers improved developer features and support for greater scalability, with the ability to handle both cloud-native and traditional applications, according to the big rouge one.

“The latest updates to the platform enable customers to more fully make use of their container technology investments and better embrace a DevOps methodology. This gives developers their needed automation tools and helps operations teams to better scale to meet customer demand, both with the aim of bringing better applications to market more quickly,” Red Hat’s OpenShift chief Ashesh Badani said in a statement.

Those developer features include new automation capabilities in its lifecycle management thanks to continuous delivery pipelines based on the Jenkins Pipeline project, while an aggregated developer dashboard offers users a unified view of application pipelines.

On the scalability side, Red Hat claims that OpenShift Container Platform 3.3 now supports configurations of up to 1,000 nodes per cluster, a boon to customers looking to operate mission-critical applications at scale. Meanwhile, an integrated, enterprise-grade version of Kubernetes 1.3 provides the ability to proactively monitor for and prevent against resource starvation and unplanned downtime, the firm said.

Security is always a key issue for enterprises, but often overlooked in the scramble to deploy new technologies. Red Hat claims that the security provisioning in OpenShift Container Platform 3.3 starts with Red Hat Enterprise Linux, which underpins the platform, and the Docker container runtime is integrated with Security Enhanced Linux to deliver additional multi-tenant security.

OpenShift also provides integrated user authorisation and role-based access controls for Kubernetes that integrate with enterprise LDAP directory systems, as well as integrated security policies for container execution.

The Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform 3.3 is set to be available for download from Sept 27th, while the hosted versions of the platform – OpenShift Online and OpenShift Dedicated – are scheduled to be updated in the near future. ®

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