Australian border cops say they've cracked 'dark net' drug sales

'We are well aware of these websites' says black-shirted Border Force


Australian authorities say they can detect dark net transactions.

We know this because the nation's Border Force (ABF), the black-shirt wearing guardians of Australia's frontiers, says as much in its takedown notice of a "31-year-old man from Port Neill" in the State of South Australia. Said man fell foul of a joint ABF and South Australia Police (SAPOL) operation that "linked him to the importation and distribution of numerous border controlled drugs via the dark net" (pic of the haul here).

"We are well aware of these websites and take any attempts to import illegal border controlled drugs very seriously," said Craig Palmer, the ABF's acting commander for immigration and customs enforcement.

The two agencies seized "910 doses of an amphetamine type substance, 380 LSD doses and 72 capsules and 15 grams of MDMA" plus a "number of other powders and liquids, which the ABF will allege were to be used in the manufacture of illicit drugs".

The ABF hasn't previously publicised arrests made as a result of dark net activities, but early in 2016 advertised for workers with information security skills. Perhaps those hires' feet are well and truly under the desk? ®

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