HPC

OpenStack brings cloud at the press of a button

Click it and go


HPC Blog Eddy Shvartsman, self-described head nerd of the IBM OpenStack Toolkit for OpenPOWER, outlined the newest version of the toolkit at the recent OpenPOWER European Summit in Barcelona.

He characterised it as a one-button cloud configuration that includes hardware, management software stack and operations management software.

According to Shvartsman all of the componentry is completely built with open-source software; better still, it is freely distributed and available at github.com.

Youtube Video

The toolkit includes all of the OpenStack private cloud features, including compute, image, identity, block storage, orchestration, networking and the Horizon dashboard. It also uses the OpenStack-Ansible project, which provides for scalability while being simple to operate.

Check out the video for Eddy’s full presentation and much more cloudy detail. ®

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