3... 2...1... and 123-Reg hit by DDoSers. Again

Happy New Year!


Updated Just days into the new year, and poor old 123-Reg is already experiencing problems, this time in the form of a DDoS attack - something it is no stranger to.

Customers have been in touch with El Reg to report their websites and email services have been down as a consequence of the attack.

The outfit tweeted just over an hour ago: "We believe a DDoS attack has just started, we are working out remediation options and impact at present. Updates to follow.

"Our networks team are continuing to scrub and reroute bad traffic. We apologise for any inconvenience during this time. Our teams are continuing to reroute traffic. A further update on this work will be provided very shortly."

Last year 123-Reg was hit with a number of DDoS attacks, having been targeted in October and August - when it experienced a 30-plus Gbps to its data centre.

During 2016 customers complained that the biz had doubled its fees. Not least because the hike followed the accidental deletion of the data of hundreds of customers, which took their websites offline.

Of the latest woes, one customer reported: "We have had multiple records across multiple domains disappear and since reappear in the last hour today."

Others tweeted:

A spokesman has told The Reg the biz's network team had been able to get all customer websites online within an hour of the noon attack. He said: "We apologise for any inconvenience and we thank our customers for their patience and understanding." ®

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