US laptops-on-planes ban may extend to flights from ALL nations

'Real, sophisticated, threat' may mean ban on flights to and from USA says Homeland Security head John Kelly


United States Homeland Security Secretary Gen. John Kelly says he's considering a ban on laptops in airline cabins from flights that leave all nations, not just Europe and the Middle East as is currently the case.

On Fox News Sunday Kelly chatted with host Chris Wallace and, at the 9:10 mark of the video below, was asked if he is going to ban laptops from the cabin on all international flights both into and out of the US?

“I might,” Kelly replied, and when asked to expand said: “There is a real threat. There's numerous threats against aviation. That's really the thing they are obsessed with, the terrorists, the idea of knocking down an airplane in flight, particularly if it is a US carrier, particularly if it is full of mostly US folks.”

Asked when a decision will be made on whether or not the ban will become universal, Kelly said: “We are still following the intelligence. The very, very good news is that we are working incredibly close with friends and partners around the world. We are going to – and in the process of defining this – but we are going to raise the bar for generally speaking aviation security much higher than it is now.”

“There are new technologies down the road, not too far down the road, that we will rely on.”

“But it is a real, sophisticated, threat. I will reserve that decision until we see where it is going.”

Youtube Video

Kelly also said that the United States Transport Security Administration (TSA) “likely will” extend a new practice of asking travellers to empty carry-on bags completely at security checkpoints. Kelly said that travellers now fill their carry-on bags so densely that screening equipment cannot accurately detect their contents, necessitating the change. Kelly said the TSA is currently testing the new procedure in select airports to ensure it is minimally disruptive ®.


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