YouTube banned many gun vids, so some moved to smut site

The Naked Gun was far funnier than this mess


YouTube has changed its Policies on content featuring firearms to prohibit videos that try to sell guns or offer “instructions on manufacturing a firearm, ammunition, high capacity magazine, homemade silencers/suppressors, or certain firearms accessories”.

The change was hardly shouted from the rooftops: the video vault squeaked it out in a Help Forum post rather than a big shiny blog.

Word of the change was therefore a little slow to spread, but the reaction was predictable: it won’t take you long to find threats of boycotts, complaints about restrictions on free speech and similar stuff.

The most interesting response, however, came from an outfit called “InRange TV”, the self-proclaimed “best gun program on the internet” that took to Facebook to say it’s added PornHub to the services it uses to distribute its content.

“We will not be seeking any monetization from PornHub and do not know what their monetization policies are, we are merely looking for a safe harbor for our content and for our viewers,” InRange’s operators Karl Kasarda and Ian McCollum wrote. Indeed, the pair said they’ve also “deleted our AdSense account entirely and moved to a crowd sourced funding model wholly via Patreon”.

YouTube’s clearly happy to lose its cut of InRange TV’s ad revenue, and to wear criticism of its new policies, in order to be part of a response to the Parkland school shooting.

PornHub users, meanwhile, now have a single destination for their flesh and firearms fetishes. What a time to be alive. ®

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