What the Dell? Qumulo slips into PowerEdge servers

Extends coverage from AWS and HPE to Isilon-slinger


Scale-out filer Qumulo's QF2 software is now available on Dell’s PowerEdge R740xd storage server, a 2U 2-socket Xeon Skylake, all-NVMe flash drive system.

The QF2 (Qumulo File Fabric) software is also available on the firm’s own storage server hardware, HPE Apollo hardware and in the AWS cloud.

It will compete, as a scale-out file system, with Dell EMC's own Isilon gear, as well as with IBM's Spectrum Scale software, Panasas parallel file system software, WekaIO, and also Elastifile.

Qumulo said the Dell QF2 incarnation can scale out to hundreds of petabytes and tens of billions of files.

While it has claimed QF2 is the most scalable and highest performance file storage system in the data centre and the public cloud, there is no independent, industry-standard validation of these claims. So far, it has been absent from industry-standard benchmarks such as the SPEC SFS 2014, which features Spectrum Scale, WekaIO and NetApp, among others.

Having Dell server support adds a hardware platform and makes it easier for Qumulo to sell its software into Dell’s server customer base, as well as enabling the firm to broadcast the anti-lock-in message so favoured by rivals to the tech titans. ®

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