HMD Global revamps infamous commuter-botherer, the Nokia 5310 XpressMusic

The budget feature phone that reminds you of Ministry of Sound sounds and football fighting Brits... maybe

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The Nokia 5310 XpressMusic was the bane of any mid-2000s commuter, used primarily by tracksuit-wearing hooligans to blast out head-thumping Ministry of Sound tunes to other weary bus-goers.

With such fond memories (ahem), it's therefore no surprise that Nokia-licensor HMD Global has rebooted it – as a new S30+ featurephone.

The revamped Nokia 5310 packs the same dedicated music hotkeys as its predecessor, as well as a front-facing dual-speaker system – which should allow you to relive your youth tormenting sullen-faced suits on their way to another soul-destroying day at the corporate grindstone.

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In terms of a display, there's a 2.4-inch QVGA screen, and the device is powered by a MediaTek MT6260A platform, paired with 8MB of RAM and 12MB of storage. Obviously, this isn't enough for your Ultrabeat mixtapes, which is where the MicroSD slot fits in: it can house cards up to 32GB.

As you'd expect from a feature phone, battery life is excellent, with up to 30 days of standby time, and 20.7 hours of talk time. The specs sheet pays no mention of Wi-Fi or Bluetooth, and the radio is only capable of 2.5G data, but it does come with a wired headphone jack. There's also a VGA camera with flash.

This is the third rebooted retro phone from HMD global, following the 3310 and the 8110.

Speaking from self-isolation in Finland, HMD Global chief product officer Juho Sarvikas suggested the new Nokia 5310 Xpress Music could serve those looking for a digital detox. And, with a pricetag of €39, it's also a viable festival phone, or one for those looking for a backup should their day-to-day smartphone let them down.

If you're tempted, the handset will be available in March. Bus tickets and DJ Sammy MP3s are sold separately. ®

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