The Edinburgh Fringe festival isn't happening this year, but that won't stop a digital sign doing its own comedy routine

Cowgate calamity befalls Windows-powered signage

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Bork!Bork!Bork! What to do in Edinburgh when there is no impending Fringe? The answer is obvious, at least to us – go hunting through streets normally thronged with tourists in search of bork.

Register reader Chris Marquis spotted signage amusing itself in the absence of humans at the end of the Scottish capital's Cowgate, just before it becomes Holyrood Road.

Whatever is powering the poorly screen, and we think it might be Windows 7 (judging by an apparent aero glass theme in action), it has choked on the ArcSoft Connected Daemon. The service itself is a relatively innocuous bit of code that lurks in the background and updates ArcSoft's products.

The company describes itself as a "Global Leader in imaging technology" so it is unsurprising to see it crop up on a big lump of digital signage. Even if that signage has been left overflowing in the bork department.

The street will be familiar to both residents and those that visit for the city's various festivals. The stairs on which the sign is located lead towards the University of Edinburgh, although have been securely bolted. Presumably to stop impoverished performers catching some shut-eye away from the weather and similarly dismal festival accommodation rental prices. Or perhaps to protect the display from those that might wish it ill. Such as the ArcSoft Connect Daemon.

A few streets from The Banshee Labyrinth, Scotland's "most haunted pub", and not far from the Pleasance Courtyard venue, the sign should benefit from the footfall of those rushing from one venue to another during busier times.

Sadly, not this year. But even if the artists, comedians and performers are locked away for the season, it is good to know that Edinburgh can still rely on the tried and trusted combination of Windows and a digital sign for The Festival of Bork. ®

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