Apple said to be removing charger, headphones from upcoming iPhone 12 series

Trying to reduce waste or funnelling punters into investing in AirPods?

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There's no such thing as a free lunch or, indeed, a free power adapter if the latest reports from famed Apple analyst Ming-Chi Kuo are correct.

A recent investment note from Ming-Chi, who is widely regarded as the most accurate soothsayer of Cupertino's movements, says Apple is expected to remove the bundled headphones and charger from the upcoming iPhone 12 series.

Ming-Chi's report lines up with earlier comments from analysts at Barclays who stated Apple would only include a USB-C to Lightning cable with its next crop of phones.

These movements coincide with efforts from the European Commission to reduce the amount of electronic waste produced by smartphone accessories.

The commission has mooted selecting a universal charging standard, which all vendors operating in the European Economic Area would be forced to include on their devices. It is also exploring the possibility of encouraging device manufacturers to unbundle cables and chargers from devices.

Of course, there's another equally plausible explanation: by removing the iPhone's charger and headphones, Apple can cut costs while bolstering its environmental credentials and directing customers to its increasingly lucrative accessories business.

Or of course, you could just decide to buy someone else's wireless rubber gubbins and never get on the AirPods treadmill.

Speaking to The Register, PP Foresight analyst Paolo Pescatore said: "It would be fair to say that most folks own a pair of headphones. Cutting this will help reduce waste as part of Apple's focus on the environment. This seems logical as Apple will want to drive demand for its own AirPods."

Apple currently sells a 5W iPhone charger for £29. A pair of EarPods with a Lightning Connector costs the same, while a Lightning-to-3.5mm Headphone Jack adapter (unbundled in 2018) costs £9. ®


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