Hats off to the brave 7%ers who dived into the Windows 10 May 2020 Update within a month of release

Still outstanding issues but gaining ground faster than previous efforts

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The Windows 10 2004 rollout is moving a little quicker than the last major update to Microsoft's OS.

Figures from Ad Duplex show the May 2020 Update hitting 7 per cent of the 150,000 Windows 10 PCs surveyed by the organisation to the end of June.

The growth has been mainly at the expense of the previous three incarnations. The last big update, Windows 10 1903, retains the bulk of installations at 46.2 per cent while the most recent version of Windows 10, 1909, which was little more than a cumulative update, dropped very slightly to 35.7 per cent of installs.

The nightmare of Windows 10 1809 further receded as the file-munching October 2018 Update fell away to 5.9 per cent.

While the rollout of the Windows 10 May 2020 Update may seem slow as Microsoft continues to demonstrate it has learned the lessons of 2018, 2004 is still slightly up on the amount of installations that 1903 had one year ago, after more than a month of General Availability. Back then Microsoft was still reeling from the October 2018 Update fiasco and treading very carefully.

It has been an interesting time for early adopters of Microsoft's latest and greatest. Windows 10 2004 launched with a multitude of known issues, including one that broke the thing for some of the company's own hardware. What made many of the issues particularly galling is that they failed to show up despite the lengthy period the release had spent in the hands of Windows Insiders.

It's almost as though it hadn't been tested properly before someone hit the Go button. Surely not?

The outstanding issues list remains lengthy, even as the May 2020 Update enters July. Older drivers for Nvidia display adapters may struggle, plugging or unplugging a Thunderbolt dock might cause a STOP error and a compatibility block for devices with certain Conexant or Synaptics audio drivers installed are merely three examples of what continues to linger at the time of writing.

We should all therefore take a moment to pay tribute to that brave 7 per cent, willing to set sail into the uncertain waters of Windows 10 2004 and click Check for updates.

They will soon be joined by others as Microsoft begins "the training of our machine learning (ML) based process used to intelligently select and automatically update devices approaching end of service." ®

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