Looks like people now pay for Trello, meaning 'ripper' fourth quarter at Atlassian

Business Class a bit too costly but Free a little limited? Here comes Standard

Atlassian has fiddled with its Trello pricing tiers and added a new one for customers who found the leap from Free to Business Class a jump too far.

Disappointingly called "Standard", the new tier is aimed at small teams and costs $5 per user per month (if you pay for a year up front) or $6 per user per month on a monthly basis.

"Standard" slots nicely between the freebie offering and "Business Class." The latter will henceforth be known as "Premium." The price, at $10 per user per month for a 12-month commitment, remains unchanged.

Users signing up for the new tier will receive unlimited boards in Trello as well as unlimited storage (although there is a 250MB file limit). 1,000 Butler automation command runs per month per Workspace are also permitted along with advanced checklists and custom fields.

That 1,000 limit has been removed in Premium, which is where all Atlassian's shiny new views (introduced earlier this year) can be found.

Kanban fans without such deep pockets can still opt for the Free tier, which now features unlimited Power-Ups as well as custom background and stickers. Limits remain, however – there are only 10 boards per workspace and files in the "unlimited storage" are limited to 10MB.

The naming of the tiers matches those of Atlassian's venerable issue tracker, Jira, which also lays claim to Free, Standard, and Premium (although priced from $0, $7 and $14 per user per month respectively).

The addition of the paid-for tier comes in wake of Atlassian's latest set of quarterly results. Co-founder and co-CEO Mike Cannon-Brookes described Q4 as "a ripper of a quarter" as the company added another 23,311 customers and $559.5m in revenues (up 30 per cent from the same period last year). Operating losses widened to $7.5m from $3.3m in Q4 FY2020.

Of those new customers, 6,520 were single-user Trello accounts. ®

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