India, Japan flex cyber-defence muscles as China kicks the Quad

Tokyo's new cyber-security policy names China, Russia, North Korea as sources of increasing threat


India and Japan have each flexed their cyber-defence muscles in ways that China can't miss.

Japan's flex was the Monday launch of a national cyber-security policy that for the first time names China, Russia, and North Korea as sources of heightened threat. The policy also calls for Japan's Self Defence Force to increase its digital capabilities.

The new plan was released as expected under Japan's policy of refreshing its defensive plans every three years. The theme for the policy is "Cybersecurity for all" and chief cabinet secretary Katsunobu Kato said its aim is to ensure that no part of Japanese society goes without the protections it needs.

Kato said the plan was also developed because Japan's government "recognised a threat" and therefore a need to strengthen its online defences. The policy documents list many recent infosec incidents – such as the attack on SolarWinds and Microsoft's Exchange flaw – as the sort of thing Japan needs to counter.

India's flex came from vice-president M. Venkaiah Naidu, who on Monday visited a military museum and remarked that India's security forces should "prepare themselves to dominate not only in a conventional war but also establish their superiority in the new and emerging areas of conflict such as information and cyber warfare along with the increasing use of robotics and drones in the battlefield".

"The nation is assured that any misadventure by an adversary will be given a befitting reply by the Indian Army," Naidu said.

While the position of vice-president is largely ceremonial – the officeholder is backup to the head of state, but actual power resides with Parliament – Naidu's words have weight. Doubly so as he stated India faces "both symmetric and asymmetric threats from outside and within" and then asserted India's sovereignty over Jammu & Kashmir and argued that previous arrangements that gave the territory autonomy were temporary.

Mentioning Jammu & Kashmir is significant, as the disputed India/China border is in the territory. The territory is also the subject of a dispute with Pakistan.

Kashmiri separatists, which India labels Pakistan-supported terrorists, and China, will all have noticed the veep urging India to arm itself in the kinetic and digital realms.

China has certainly noticed last week's meeting of "The Quad" – the grouping of Australia, the USA, Japan, and India – and its announcement of plans to develop infosec standards it hopes the world will follow.

China's foreign ministry has labelled The Quad a "closed and exclusive clique" informed by "outdated Cold War zero-sum mentality and ideological bias".

Spokesperson Hua Chunying addressed the issue at a press conference in response to a question from Russian news agency TASS. "For some time, these countries have been keen on insinuating China with the so-called 'rules-based order', playing up and inciting the so-called 'China threat' theory, and driving a wedge between regional countries and China."

Te actions of Japan and India actions suggest the wedge is working. ®

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