Five data centers, 150TB images downloaded weekly, 1m+ cores – Now, that’s a storage challenge

Find out exactly how Workday and Red Hat cracked it


Webinar Challenges tend to bring people together. And that’s certainly the case when it comes to how Workday and Red Hat tackled the problem of scaling storage across the management software giant’s private cloud.

Workday’s cloud runs across five data centers, with a compute core count that currently stands at 1 million and is doubling year on year, and handles 150TB of images downloaded weekly, during an extremely tight maintenance window.

For the last eight years, Red Hat Ceph has been at the heart of Workday’s storage strategy, in a collaboration that has spawned upstream contributions from the Workday and Red Hat engineering teams that the entire community benefit from.

This might leave you asking, how did they actually do it? And indeed, could I do the same thing too?

Well, don’t fret, because those were exactly the sort of issues we addressed in a recent webinar, Scaling Our Storage Platform in the Private Cloud, and you can relive it all, right here, now.

Our own Tim Phillips, always worth a replay, was joined by Sergio de Carvalho from Workday and Uday Boppana from Red Hat, to discuss how Workday deployed the Linux vendor’s Ceph in its data centers as it worked to expand its footprint.

They delved into how Workday came to the conclusion that software-defined storage was the right way to solve its storage challenges.

They also took Tim through how the two firms deployed Ceph and worked together to iron out the inevitable bumps in the road that emerge during such a wide-ranging installation.

All you need to do to benefit from Red Hat and Workday’s experience is to head to the registration page here, drop in a few details, and hit play.

Whatever your own storage challenges, replaying this webinar will leave you better placed to deal with them. And it won’t eat up much of your own storage either.

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