Head of Big Tech Expertise? Believe it or not, it's a UK.gov vacancy for a Whitehall job

What happened to loosening stranglehold of major tech firms on the public sector?


UK government is on the hunt for an expert to help shape relations with the likes of AWS, Microsoft and Google, a role that includes a remit to "fulfil partnership opportunities" with the megacorps and "deliver against their needs and demands."

The Head of Big Tech Expertise role is based within the Digital and Tech Policy Directorate of the Department of Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) - the “heart of the Government’s strategic policy-making and industry engagement on all things relating to tech and digital”.

"Are you interested in the way Big Tech shapes other UK economy and society? Do you want to work with the most powerful technology companies in the world (sic)," the job ad asks.

The ideal candidate will be an "inquisitive" sort that is "self motivated" to work across Whitehall – the civil service for non-Brit readers – helping the digital economy to grow.

"The Unit works across Whitehall to create a strategic and coordinated approach to Government's relationship with the biggest tech companies, fulfil partnership opportunities and deliver against the needs and demands of this hugely exciting portfolio of companies."

During the selection process, recruiters will assess against the following behaviours: seeing the Big Picture (cough); communicating and influencing; delivering at pace; working together.

A decade ago, UK government was telling anyone that would listen it was going to loosen the stranglehold major tech companies had on the public sector. Fast-forward 10 years and it feels like that battle was lost. Mostly, the same familiar names are still milking the taxpayer, with the major addition of tax efficient AWS.

Big Tech has become more powerful, not less, particularly so in the past 20-plus months since the pandemic revolutionised the world of work and education, forcing more businesses and governments to digitise processes.

So what can a public sector person rubbing shoulders with execs at Big Tech as the Head of Big Tech Expertise expect in the way of financial remuneration? There's no lunch budget for starters, unless the successful applicant is willing to use their own salary to finance it. That salary? Up to £58,207 annually for someone based in London, or up to £52,968 for someone located elsewhere in the UK.

Here's the full ad. Applications close on 7 February. Those with added snark need not apply. ®


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