Sony Interactive Entertainment pulls PlayStation from Russia

Ukraine's digital transformation minister asked for action to bore Russians into protest – he has his wish


Sony Interactive Entertainment has suspended all software and hardware shipments to Russia and closed the local PlayStation store.

Ukraine's vice prime minister and minister for digital transformation, Mykhailo Fedorov, suggested the move on March 2.

Sony responded on March 10.

The decision won't brick PlayStations in Russia, but will mean locals can't buy new games or kit.

Microsoft did likewise when it announced a suspension of all new sales into Russia last week, and major games publishers have also quit Russia.

Red Hat and SUSE latest to suspend sales in Russia

READ MORE

Minister Fedorov's suggestion that it may be possible to bore Russians into action that would see them take steps to stop the war has also seen Netflix leave the country.

Amazon has done likewise, announcing it will suspend Prime Video in Russia and stop product deliveries, following a previous decision not to sign any more Amazon Web Services customers in the nation.

Fedorov has also thanked PayPal for bringing its services to Ukraine, and saluted Elon Musk for delivering promised Starlink satellite internet transceivers.

But the minister has continued to write to more tech companies in the hope they either quit Russia or work harder to help Ukraine – or even both. In recent days he's asked Union Pay, Intel, and Hitachi to pull the plug on Putin. ®


Other stories you might like

  • Start using Modern Auth now for Exchange Online
    Before Microsoft shutters basic logins in a few months

    The US government is pushing federal agencies and private corporations to adopt the Modern Authentication method in Exchange Online before Microsoft starts shutting down Basic Authentication from the first day of October.

    In an advisory [PDF] this week, Uncle Sam's Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) noted that while federal executive civilian branch (FCEB) agencies – which includes such organizations as the Federal Communications Commission, Federal Trade Commission, and such departments as Homeland Security, Justice, Treasury, and State – are required to make the change, all organizations should make the switch from Basic Authentication.

    "Federal agencies should determine their use of Basic Auth and migrate users and applications to Modern Auth," CISA wrote. "After completing the migration to Modern Auth, agencies should block Basic Auth."

    Continue reading
  • Behold this drone-dropping rifle with two-mile range
    Confuses rather than destroys unmanned aerials to better bring back intel, says Ukrainian designer

    What's said to be a Ukrainian-made long-range anti-drone rifle is one of the latest weapons to emerge from Russia's ongoing invasion of its neighbor.

    The Antidron KVS G-6 is manufactured by Kvertus Technology, in the western Ukraine region of Ivano-Frankivsk, whose capital of the same name has twice been subjected to Russian bombings during the war. Like other drone-dropping equipment, we're told it uses radio signals to interrupt control, remotely disabling them, and it reportedly has an impressive 3.5 km (2.17 miles) range.

    "We are not damaging the drone. With communication lost, it just loses coordination and doesn't know where to go. The drone lands where it is jammed, or can be carried away by the wind because it's uncontrollable,"  Kvertus' director of technology Yaroslav Filimonov said. Because the downed drones are unharmed, they give Ukrainian soldiers recovering them a wealth of potential intelligence, he added.  

    Continue reading
  • Microsoft gives its partners power to change AD privileges on customer systems – without permission
    Somewhat counterintuitively, this is being done to improve security

    Microsoft has created a window of time in which its partners can – without permission – create new roles for themselves in customers' Active Directory implementations.

    Which sounds bonkers, so let's explain why Microsoft has even entertained the prospect.

    To begin, remember that criminals have figured out that attacking IT service providers offers a great way to find many other targets. Evidence of that approach can be found in attacks on ConnectWise, SolarWinds, Kaseya and other vendors that provide software to IT service providers.

    Continue reading
  • FabricScape: Microsoft warns of vuln in Service Fabric
    Not trying to spin this as a Linux security hole, surely?

    Microsoft is flagging up a security hole in its Service Fabric technology when using containerized Linux workloads, and urged customers to upgrade their clusters to the most recent release.

    The flaw is tracked as CVE-2022-30137, an elevation-of-privilege vulnerability in Microsoft's Service Fabric. An attacker would need read/write access to the cluster as well as the ability to execute code within a Linux container granted access to the Service Fabric runtime in order to wreak havoc.

    Through a compromised container, for instance, a miscreant could gain control of the resource's host Service Fabric node and potentially the entire cluster.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022