AMD refreshes Ryzen Embedded line with R2000 series

The target? Thin clients and industrial devices – with new SoC family running up to 4 independent displays


Embedded World AMD is bringing to market a new generation of Ryzen chips for embedded apps promising more CPU cores, enhanced built-in graphics and expanded I/O connectivity to drive kit such as IoT devices and thin clients.

Crucially, AMD plans to make the R2000 Series available for up to 10 years, providing OEM customers with a long-lifecycle support roadmap. This is an important aspect for components in embedded systems, which may be operating in situ for longer periods than the typical three to five-year lifecycle of corporate laptops and servers.

The Ryzen Embedded R2000 Series is AMD's second-generation of mid-range system-on-chip (SoC) processors that combine CPU cores plus Radeon graphics, and target a range of embedded systems such as industrial and robotic hardware, machine vision, IoT and thin client devices. The first, R1000, came out in 2019.

The R2000s were rolled out today at the Embedded World 2022 conference in Nuremberg, Germany, with the SoCs featuring up to four "Zen+" CPU cores and up to eight Radeon graphic compute units (CUs). This compares with two Zen cores and three compute units in the previous R1000 family. Zen+ is the same core design as Zen, but manufactured with a 12nm process to deliver higher clock speeds and improved power consumption.

Due to these improvements, AMD claims that the R2000 Series has up to 81 percent higher CPU and graphics performance than the R1000 Series chips.

AMD's corporate VP for its Adaptive & Embedded Computing Group Rajneesh Gaur said the new chips would likely find their way into mini PCs as well as embedded applications such as thin clients.

"The Embedded R2000 Series provides system designers with more performance, optimized power and better graphics, all with a seamless upgrade path," he added.

The chips in production now are versions with 4 cores / 4 threads and 2 cores / 4 threads, with a couple of 4 core / 8 threads versions due for availability in October.

With its embedded graphics, the new SoC family can drive up to four independent displays at up to 4K resolution, through HDMI 2.0b, DisplayPort 1.4 or Embedded DisplayPort (eDP) 1.3 interfaces.

The expanded I/O capabilities comprise 6 lanes of PCIe Gen3, a pair of SATA 3.0 ports, and 6 USB ports (a mix of USB 3.2 Gen2 and 2.0). However, one notable absence is the lack of any Ethernet port. Operating system support includes Windows 10 and 11, plus Ubuntu Linux LTS.

For security purposes, the R2000 Series include AMD’s integrated Secure Processor, which provides security functions such as validating code before it is allowed to execute and the Memory Guard feature which protects data sitting in memory by encrypting it - which is transparent to applications.®

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