Yodel becomes the latest victim of a cyber 'incident'

British parcel delivery firm 'working around the clock' to get systems back and running


Delivery company Yodel has found itself the latest victim of a cyber "incident" that has disrupted services.

Rooted firmly to the bottom of the table of best and worst courier firms by consumer campaigner Which? Yodel has gained popularity and, perhaps, a bit of notoriety in recent years as consumers turned to courier companies rather than venture into physical stores.

yodel

Click to enlarge

Exactly when security problems began is difficult to ascertain, since Yodel's social media voicebox is crammed full of disgruntled customers wondering where their products are (indeed, this writer had the joy of a piece of hardware being lifted from one of the company's depots back in 2019, but that's another story...).

However, by June 21 the company changed its customer service narrative to "Yodel is currently experiencing operational disruption affecting our delivery service."

Yodel's website was also updated to reflect that its services were not at all well.

The Register contacted the company to find out what was happening, and a spokesperson said: "Yodel has experienced a cyber incident that has caused some disruption. We are servicing customers but tracking is currently impacted.

"As soon as we detected the incident, we launched an investigation, led by our internal IT division and supported by an external IT forensics group. We are working to restore tracking as quickly as we can and have engaged with all relevant authorities.

"Yodel would like to sincerely apologise to their clients and their customers for any disruption this incident may have caused, and reassure them that the team are working around the clock to resolve this incident."

Other communications were shared on social media, suggesting that the incident was indeed serious. The Register contacted the ICO for more information and will update with any response.

Yodel is part of Logistics Group Holdings, and according to Companies House filings [PDF], it recorded earnings before income tax, depreciation and amortisation of £65.7 million in fiscal 2021, up from £9.5 million in 2020.

Yodel is just the latest victim of a cyber "incident" and undoubtedly will not be the last. The company's experience is a reminder of the importance of both robust defences and a robust recovery plan.

As for its customers… well, far be it from us to wonder if a lack of service will be all that different to normal service. ®

Similar topics


Other stories you might like

  • Cisco warns of security holes in its security appliances
    Bugs potentially useful for rogue insiders, admin account hijackers

    Cisco has alerted customers to another four vulnerabilities in its products, including a high-severity flaw in its email and web security appliances. 

    The networking giant has issued a patch for that bug, tracked as CVE-2022-20664. The flaw is present in the web management interface of Cisco's Secure Email and Web Manager and Email Security Appliance in both the virtual and hardware appliances. Some earlier versions of both products, we note, have reached end of life, and so the manufacturer won't release fixes; it instead told customers to migrate to a newer version and dump the old.

    This bug received a 7.7 out of 10 CVSS severity score, and Cisco noted that its security team is not aware of any in-the-wild exploitation, so far. That said, given the speed of reverse engineering, that day is likely to come. 

    Continue reading
  • Google battles bots, puts Workspace admins on alert
    No security alert fatigue here

    Google has added API security tools and Workspace (formerly G-Suite) admin alerts about potentially risky configuration changes such as super admin passwords resets.

    The API capabilities – aptly named "Advanced API Security" – are built on top of Apigee, the API management platform that the web giant bought for $625 million six years ago.

    As API data makes up an increasing amount of internet traffic – Cloudflare says more than 50 percent of all of the traffic it processes is API based, and it's growing twice as fast as traditional web traffic – API security becomes more important to enterprises. Malicious actors can use API calls to bypass network security measures and connect directly to backend systems or launch DDoS attacks.

    Continue reading
  • Zero Trust: What does it actually mean – and why would you want it?
    'Narrow and specific access rights after authentication' wasn't catchy enough

    Systems Approach Since publishing our article and video on APIs, I’ve talked with a few people on the API topic, and one aspect that keeps coming up is the importance of security for APIs.

    In particular, I hear the term “zero trust” increasingly being applied to APIs, which led to the idea for this post. At the same time, I’ve also noticed what might be called a zero trust backlash, as it becomes apparent that you can’t wave a zero trust wand and instantly solve all your security concerns.

    Zero trust has been on my radar for almost a decade, as it was part of the environment that enabled network virtualization to take off. We’ve told that story briefly in our SDN book – the rise of microsegmentation as a widespread use-case was arguably the critical step that took network virtualization from a niche technology to the mainstream.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022