Software

How's this for irony? US Navy hit with $600m software piracy claim

German software house says sailors are just the wurst


A German software developer has accused the United States Navy of illegally copying $596m worth of its product.

Bitmanagement Software GmbH claims that the Navy has copied "hundreds of thousands" of copies of its 3D modeling and tracking software BS Contact Geo without paying.

They have filed suit [PDF] in the US Court of Federal Claims asking for damages of "not less than $596,308,103."

Designed for 3D meetings, training, and collaboration, Bitmanagement touts the BS Geo software "uniquely enables interactive collaboration among multiple users in one virtual environment simultaneously, with high-quality graphics that appear crisp and sharp even on simple computers."

According to Bitmanagement's claim, it first began working with the Navy on a pilot program in 2011 that called for 38 copies of the software to be installed.

Following the trial program, the software developer claims that it was led to believe the Navy was going to expand the use of BS Geo by purchasing additional licenses for a large-scale deployment in 2013. During that time, Bitmanagement says it disabled the copy-protection software on BS Geo at the Navy's request.

Between 2013 and 2015, while negotiations for the licenses were going on, Bitmanagement claims the Navy proceeded to distribute and reinstall BS Contact Geo on at least 558,466 machines, despite only having paid for the initial 38 licenses.

"The government knew or should have known that it was required to obtain a license for copying Bitmanagment software onto each of the devices that had Bitmanagement software installed," the complaint charges.

"The government nonetheless failed to obtain such licenses."

Bitmanagement reckons that, at a per-copy price of $1,067.76 (€800), the Navy owes it roughly $596m for its use of the software. It is suing the US government for multiple violations of US copyright law. ®

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China’s top three telcos advise of imminent delisting from New York Stock Exchange

Trump-era Executive Order gets China Telecom, China Unicom, and China Mobile kicked off bourse

China’s top three telcos – China Telecom, China Mobile and China Unicom – have warned investors they are about to be delisted by the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE).

The three carriers are all also listed on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange, and last Friday updated investors there with filings that boiled down to saying they appealed against their de-listing in New York, but that on May 6th they received correspondence saying their appeals failed.

The source of this situation is Executive Order 13959 that prohibited US citizens from investing in several Chinese enterprises on grounds that they finance “Communist Chinese military companies”. The Executive Order says the carriers NYSE listings means China “exploits United States investors to finance the development and modernization of its military.”

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US declares emergency after ransomware shuts US oil pipeline that pumps 100 million gallons a day

Oil transport by road allowed after Colonial Pipeline goes down, says recovery is under way but offers no recovery date

One of the USA’s largest oil pipelines has been shut by ransomware, leading the nation's Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration to issue an regional emergency declaration permitting the transport of fuel by road.

The Colonial Pipeline, which says it carries 100 million gallons a day of refined fuels between Houston, Texas, and New York Harbor, or 45 percent of all fuel needed on the USA’s East Coast. The pipeline carries fuel for cars and trucks, jet fuel, and heating oil.

It’s been offline since May 7th, according to a company statement, due to what the outfit describes as “… a cybersecurity attack [that] involves ransomware.”

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You can listen right here to the whir of a robot helicopter flying on an alien world

NASA records, shares sound of Ingenuity drone on Mars, like we're in some kind of sci-fi flick

Video One of the microphones on Perseverance, NASA’s latest and greatest Mars rover, has recorded the sounds of its autonomous helicopter Ingenuity flying on the Red Planet, providing scientists with the first ever audio samples of an aircraft operating on another planet.

You can hear the recording in the video below. Make sure to listen out for a low buzzing sound, which comes from its rotors spinning at 2,537 rpm, as the drone flits in and out of view.

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Tesla Autopilot is a lot dumber than CEO Musk claims, says Cali DMV after speaking to the software's boss

'Elon's tweet does not match engineering reality' states poorly redacted report

Tesla CEO Elon Musk's public statements about the state of his automaker's Autopilot assistive driving technology overestimate the system's capabilities, according to documents released by the California Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV).

Legal non-profit PlainSite obtained the DMV documents via the California Public Records Act and they include a summary, written by Miguel Acosta, chief of the DMV's Autonomous Vehicles Branch, of a March 9, 2021 meeting between DMV officials and Tesla personnel.

Acosta wrote that "DMV asked CJ [CJ Moore, director of Autopilot software at Tesla] to address, from an engineering perspective, Elon’s messaging about L5 capability by the end of the year."

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Facebook: Nice iOS app of ours you have there, would be a shame if you had to pay for it

Antisocial giant insists 'Help keep FB free of charge' messaging is merely educational

The number of Facebook and Instagram users on iOS agreeing to be tracked by the social networking behemoth for targeted ads has fallen drastically in the week since Apple's iOS 14.5 debuted – and Zuck & Co have hit back.

The App Tracking Transparency framework in iOS 14.5 requires companies to ask permission to observe the activities of iOS app users – that is to say, to link application usage and data with user or device information collected from other sources for targeted advertising or analytics.

This opt-in regime looks to be an extinction event for the current incarnation of targeted advertising, on iOS at least. According to analytics biz Flurry, only about 12 per cent of iOS users worldwide and only four per cent in the US have decided they want to be tracked.

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Xpand your horizons: MariaDB launches distributed query engine into proprietary DBaaS

But beware lock-in-as-a-service, analyst warns

MariaDB has added proprietary bells and whistles, in the form of distributed SQL, for its DBaaS and supposedly developer-friendly front end.

The biz supporting the open-source MySQL-derived database introduced its DBaaS SkySQL last year and has now announced the general availability of its distributed SQL as one of the engines in MariaDB's SkySQL system, said CMO Franz Aman.

"What's cool about distributed SQL is that you get all the scale of NoSQL, but you get it with all the benefits of relational," he said. "So, you have strong consistency, you have full SQL vocabulary, but at a scale that is ready for the internet for internet-scale."

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Russian cyber-spies changed tactics after the UK and US outed their techniques – so here's a list of those changes

Plus: NCSC warns of how hostile powers may exploit smart city infrastructure

Russian spies from APT29 responded to Western agencies outing their tactics by adopting a red-teaming tool to blend into targets' networks as a legitimate pentesting exercise.

Now, the UK's National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) and the US warn, the SVR is busy exploiting a dozen critical-rated vulns (including RCEs) in equipment ranging from Cisco routers through to VMware virtualization kit – and the well-known Pulse Secure VPN flaw, among others.

"In one example identified by the NCSC, the actor had searched for authentication credentials in mailboxes, including passwords and PKI keys," warned the GCHQ offshoot today.

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GitLab's 10-day certification freebie offer lasted only two because, surprise surprise, people really like freebies

Biz expected 4,000 signups, got 60,000, system couldn't cope

GitLab says a surge in demand and a technical shortcoming resulted in the DevOps outfit yanking a free certification offer barely two days after turning on the tap.

In a postmortem write-up this week, GitLab manager Christine Yoshida said the infrastructure of its glossy "learning experience ... eventually hit a system limit" as excited users piled on, and the promotion period was ended early.

A discount code was made available in April to people who wanted to get GitLab-certified. The 100 per cent discount was planned to last for ten days, and the GitLab gang figured 4,000 users would sign up.

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British bank TSB says it will fix days-long transaction troubles tonight

Totally Sucks, Buddy: Debit payments held up since April, online and app still wobbly, say readers

TSB admitted today it still hadn't fixed a transaction processing issue that has for days held up customers' payments, with users continuing to have issues at the time of publication.

We're told the transaction hold-up, which the Edinburgh-based bank said was linked to debit accounts, would be resolved "overnight." It did claim to have fixed a "temperamental" technical fault preventing some customers from accessing their online accounts, however.

Reg readers who double up as customers of TSB – once known as the comedy bank because of the frequency at which its web-based services fell over – maintained they were still having troubles logging onto the app or website, with some having experienced issues for days.

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Privacy activist Max Schrems on Microsoft's EU data move: It won't keep the NSA away

Software giant vows data processing of EU cloud services to stay in EU, which means that currently...

Microsoft has announced plans to ensure data processing of EU cloud services within the borders of the political bloc in a move that expert observers claim reveals problems with the firm's existing setup.

Those problems extend to UK public sector organisations seeking to stick within government guidance as well as a longstanding issue where personal data held in the EU can potentially be accessed via US security laws.

In a blog, Brad Smith, Microsoft’s president and chief legal officer, said the software and cloud services giant would, by the end 2022, enable EU customers of Azure, Microsoft 365, and Dynamics 365 to have all their data processed physically within the EU.

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We were 'blindsided' by Epic's cheek, claims Apple exec on 4th day of antitrust wrangling

I thought we were friends

An Apple exec has spoken of his shock after Fortnite creator Epic Games installed a hotfix that allowed it to deploy its own payment methods, thus skirting the 30 per cent App Store tax.

Testifying on the fourth day of the bench trial, Apple's vice president of App Store, Matt Fischer, said he had been "blindsided" by the deployment of the workaround, given the amicable relationship previously enjoyed by both companies.

Fischer said (audio here) that Apple's marketing teams had previously promoted in-game events taking place within Fortnite involving DJ Marshmello and rapper Travis Scott. He also claimed that Cupertino had expressed a willingness to reconsider its prohibition on the in-game gifting of virtual items.

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