On-Prem

Personal Tech

Canon makes 'all-in-one' printers that refuse to scan when out of ink, lawsuit claims

We can't wait to see the logic gymnastics needed to justify this


Canon USA has been accused of forcing customers to buy ink cartridges when they only want to scan and fax documents using the manufacturer's so-called All-In-One multi-function printers.

David Leacraft bought a Canon PIXMA MG2522 All-in-One Printer from Walmart in March, and was appalled when his device was incapable of scanning or a faxing documents if it ran low, or out, of ink. Unlike printing, scanning and faxing documents do not ordinarily require ink.

He wouldn’t have spent the 100 bucks on Canon’s printer if he had known this, his legal team noted. Feeling cheated, Leacraft fired a lawsuit at Canon USA, seeking class-action status on behalf of other disgruntled customers.

“There is no legitimate purpose for selling the All-In-One Printers with scanning or faxing functionality that is directly tied to existence or level of ink contained in the devices,” Leacraft's complaint [PDF], filed last week in a New York federal court, stated.

”Ink is not needed for scanning or faxing functionality. Ink does not improve scanning or faxing performance. Tying the scan or fax capabilities of the All-In-One Printers to ink contained in the devices offers no benefit, and only serves to disadvantage and financially harm consumers.”

Canon is accused of deceiving folks with false advertising. It's All-In-One printer series are marketed as being “multi-functional”; they can perform tasks like faxing and scanning as well as printing. But Canon didn’t fairly warn customers its devices would not work at all if they contained little or no ink, the lawsuit argued.

Leacraft wants Canon to pay damages, stop its “misleading advertising and marketing campaign,” and make it clear to consumers that its printers don’t fax or scan documents without ink. The biz could be forced to cough up at least $5m to disgruntled customers because there are more than 100 class members who have been affected by the issue, according to the lawsuit.

The Register has asked Canon for comment. ®

Send us news
179 Comments

Utility biz Delta-Montrose Electric Association loses billing capability and two decades of records after cyber attack

All together now - R, A, N, S, O...

A US utility company based in Colorado was hit by a ransomware attack in November that wiped out two decades' worth of records and knocked out billing systems that won't be restored until next week at the earliest.

The attack was detailed by the Delta-Montrose Electric Association (DMEA) in a post on its website explaining that current customers won't be penalised for being unable to pay their bills because of the incident.

"We are a victim of a malicious cyber security attack. In the middle of an investigation, that is as far as I’m willing to go," DMEA chief exec Alyssa Clemsen Roberts told a public board meeting, as reported by a local paper.

Continue reading

Feds charge two men with claiming ownership of others' songs to steal YouTube royalty payments

Alleged scheme said to have netted $20m since 2017

The US Attorney's Office of Arizona on Wednesday announced the indictment of two men on charges that they defrauded musicians and associated companies by claiming more than $20m in royalty payments for songs played on YouTube.

The 30-count indictment against Jose Teran, 36, of Scottsdale, Arizona, and Webster Batista, 38, of Doral, Florida, was returned by a grand jury on November 16, 2021. It accuses the two men of conspiracy, wire fraud, transactional money laundering, and aggravated identity theft in connection with a scheme to steal YouTube payments.

"In short, Batista and Teran, as individuals and through various entities that they operate and control, fraudulently claimed to have the legal rights to monetize a music library of more than 50,000 songs," the indictment [PDF] alleges.

Continue reading

Hot not-Spot-bot spot: The code behind Xiaomi's CyberDog? Ubuntu

Your four-legged open-source friend? CIMON says 'Maybe'

Linux fans rejoice: the smarts running behind Xiaomi's Not-Spot, CyberDog, emanate from none other than Ubuntu 18.04.

The Register asked Canonical why not something a little fresher, such as 20.04, and were told by robotics product manager, Gabriel Aguiar Noury, that "the operating system is running 18.04 rather than 20.04 because they are using Jetson, and 18.04 is more compatible for the approach the team had in mind."

The CyberDog bounded onto the global stage in August and represented the company's first foray into the world of quadruped robotics.

Continue reading

What will life in orbit look like after the ISS? NASA hands out new space station contracts

The end is coming, and nobody wants a homeless 'naut

NASA has splashed the cash on design contracts for space stations and a multibillion-dollar job for more Artemis boosters.

With the days of the International Space Station (ISS) numbered, NASA is looking to maintain an uninterrupted US presence in low-Earth orbit. Although Axiom Space has plans to build from the ISS, the $415.6m award is about developing space station designs and "other commercial destinations in space."

Blue Origin, which has partnered with Sierra Space to develop the Orbital Reef, received $130m. Nanoracks, which is working on a commercial low-Earth orbit destination called "Starlab" (with Voyager Space and Lockheed Martin), received $160m, and Northrop Grumman's Cygnus-based station received $125.6m. The Cygnus currently does duty as a freighter for the ISS.

Continue reading

Why your external monitor looks awful on Arm-based Macs, the open source fix – and the guy who wrote it

Q&A with the developer of BetterDummy: from macOS secrets to his motivations

Interview Folks who use Apple Silicon-powered Macs with some third-party monitors are disappointed with the results: text and icons can appear too tiny or blurry, or the available resolutions are lower than what the displays are capable of.

It took an open source programmer working in his spare time to come up with a workaround that doesn't involve purchasing a hardware dongle to fix what is a macOS limitation.

István Tóth lives in Hungary, and called his fix BetterDummy. It works by creating a virtual display in software and then mirroring that virtual display to the real one, to coax macOS into playing ball. The latest version, 1.0.12, was released just a few days ago, and the code is free and MIT licensed.

Continue reading

Chill out to the sounds of an expert typing on a variety of mechanical keyboards

A truly rare groove

Discerning writers and programmers know that keyboards matter. It's mostly the feel, but the best feel tends to come from mechanical key switches and they make a noise as they activate.

That feeling goes hand in hand with a chorus of soft clicks… and thanks to custom keyboard guru Taeha "Nathan" Kim and weirdo label Trunk Records, you can relax to 43 minutes and 24 seconds of soothing sounds from 13 rare and limited-edition mechanical keyboards.

Your correspondent is a bit of a fan of devices like this (this piece was typed on a 1991 IBM Model M; accept no substitute) – but no such brash, commonplace kit features on the album. Instead you can luxuriate to the Alps switches of a 1987 Apple Standard (why, yes, I do happen to have one of those too, but the linear cursor keys hinder daily use), and an M0110A from a Mac Plus, as well as more exotic kit.

Continue reading

Netgear router flaws exploitable with authentication ... like the default creds on Netgear's website

Don't just install the patch, change your router passwords too

Two arbitrary code execution vulnerabilities affecting a number of Netgear routers aimed at small businesses have been patched following research by Immersive Labs.

The vulns rely on authenticated access to affected devices so aren't an immediate threat. They do, however, allow someone with remote access to the router to pwn the device's underlying OS, threatening the security of data passing through the router.

Helpfully, Netgear itself publishes default login credentials for "most" of its products on its website. If you haven't been into your Netgear router's admin panel and changed these default creds, you're at increased risk.

Continue reading

Not only was the UK Financial Ombudsman Service's Workday system months late, 38 IT workers' jobs are at risk

Questions remain over data warehouse dependencies and redundancies

The UK's Financial Ombudsman Service (FOS) has gone live on Workday finance and HR systems around three months later than planned, drawing questions over an interdependent data warehouse project.

At the same time, the process has seen IT roles marked for redundancy and set to be transferred to a service supplier.

The watchdog was set up by Parliament in 2001 to resolve complaints between financial businesses and their customers. This week, Workday published a statement boasting that the implementation of its software at the FOS had gone live.

Continue reading

AWS previews SDKs for Rust, Kotlin, Swift, and Amplify Studio for rapid web apps

Plus: Why company foresees growth of Rust, already widely used internally

Re:invent AWS previewed new developer resources at its Re:invent conference, including new SDKs for Rust, Swift, and Kotlin, as well as Amplify Studio for rapid web applications, integrated with the Figma design tool.

The SDKs provide a language wrapper for APIs to AWS services. Existing SDKs target JavaScript, Python, PHP, .NET (C#), Ruby, Java, Go, Node.js, and C++. Now three more were this week added. Kotlin is the official language for Android and runs primarily on the JVM (Java Virtual Machine). Swift is Apple's language for iOS and macOS, and can also be used on a server. Rust is the language developed by Mozilla to be nearly as fast as C but with memory safety and other modern features.

"Rust has a lot of use internally as well, we've seen it become adopted quite rapidly within AWS and within Amazon," Ken Exner, GM for AWS Developer Tools, told The Register. "EC2 uses it, S3 uses it, CloudFront, DynamoDB."

Continue reading

One white cat and a volcano short of a Bond villain: Rocket Lab's Peter Beck shows off the 'Hungry Hippo'

Neutron updated, but the Spectre of SpaceX looms

Rocket Lab showed off progress on its Neutron rocket yesterday, with a "Hungry Hippo" fairing design more reminiscent of a '60s spy flick than a'70s table-top kid amuser.

Continue reading

When it comes to renting tech kit, things can get personal, very quickly

Is hardware by subscription bad for customers? Readers have their say

Register Debate There's a reason why it's called a personal computer, and boy did this week's debate remind us all of the fact. We'd thrown open the motion that Renting Hardware on a Subscription Basis is Bad for Customers.

The results were close. After all, traditional leasing has always been part of the corporate (non) ownership arsenal while the cloud already accounts for a vast amount of enterprise infrastructure.

This is how the readership voted:

Continue reading