Killer hamster ices owner

Warning: no IT angle


A Japanese man died after a bite from his pet hamster caused anaphylactic shock, Mainichi Shimbun reports. Ther nameless forty-something succumbed after repeated bites from the animal sensitised his immune system to such a degree that the final mouthful provoked a fatal bout of asthma.

An autopsy proved that the victim had suffered an acute reaction to protein contained in the homicidal hamster's saliva. Shortly after the assault, he began to cough and wheeze. By the time he reached Saitama Red Cross Hospital, his heart and lungs had ceased to function.

Hospital doctor Kazuya Kiyota noted that although 17 cases of pet-induced anaphylaxis had been reported in Japan since 1995, death as a result was rare. Whether al-Qaeda or the black ops arm of the CIA are taking an interest in the furry Nikita is not noted. ®

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