Microsoft touts AMD, snubs Intel with Yukon beta

SQL Server 2005 comes to the masses


Microsoft's SQL Server 2005 database has reached the plebs in the form of a beta 2 release that includes, among other things, support for AMD's Opteron processor but not for Intel's similar 64-bit Xeon chip.

The upcoming database - code-named Yukon - is now available to some 500,000 MSDN subscribers here. Close to 3,000 select testers were allowed to peek at the first beta, and a third beta program is scheduled to start by the end of this year. Microsoft now expects a final version of the database to arrive "in the first half of 2005." It had once hoped to deliver the software by the end of this year.

Microsoft highlighted the support for Opteron as one of the major new features in the second beta.

"As enterprises transition from 32- to 64-bit computing, they need the smooth migration path to 64-bit computing that AMD64 provides," Marty Seyer, vice president and general manager of the microprocessor business unit at AMD, said in a Microsoft statement. "We invite beta testers to experience for themselves how AMD64 with Direct Connect Architecture can help eliminate the bottlenecks inherent in a front-side bus and improve overall system performance and efficiency."

Microsoft made no mention of Intel's recently released x86-64-bit Xeon processor that competes with Opteron. A company spokeswoman, however, said support for Intel's chip would arrive by the time SQL Server 2005 ships next year.

Microsoft has also put out SQL Server Management Studio - formerly known as SQL Server "workbench" - in the second beta. This software combines Enterprise Manager, Query Analyzer and Analysis Manager into one tool and adds support for SQL Server Reporting Services, Notification Services, XML and SQL Server 2005 Mobile Edition. The second beta also includes database mirroring, database snapshots, partitioning, database encryption and a host of other high-end functions. These additions are clearly meant to help Microsoft compete against the likes of Oracle and IBM. ®

Related stories

Developers' sneak peek at SQL Server 2005
Windows XP SP2 slips into Fall
(Almost) everything may go, as Longhorn rushes to release
Microsoft irks ISVs with XP SP2 delay
MS delays Yukon


Other stories you might like

  • Failed gambler? How about an algorithm that predicts the future
    Hopefully an end to '... and you'll never guess what happened next!'

    Something for the Weekend Another coffee, please. Yes, I know we're about to start. There is always time for one more coffee. It's good for your brain. Thanks.

    Could you hold my cup for a moment? I need to visit the restroom. Yes, I know we're about to start; you told me that already. There is always time for coffee AND a comfort break. Yes, I know the two are related but I don't have time to chat about it. I'm bursting here.

    How about I drink the coffee straight away, nip to the WC, and return pronto? Slurp argh that's hot. Thanks, I'll be right back.

    Continue reading
  • Seriously, you do not want to make that cable your earth
    Network? What's that when it's at home?

    On Call This week we bring you a shocking incident for a Register reader who was party to an electrical engineer's earthly delights.

    "Andrew" takes us back to the 1980s, the days of DECNet, DEC Rainbow PCs, and the inevitable VAX or two.

    Back then, DECnet was a big noise in networking. Originally conceived in the 1970s to connect PDP-11 minis, it had evolved over the years and was having its time in the sun before alternative networking technologies took over.

    Continue reading
  • Protecting data now as the quantum era approaches
    Startup QuSecure is the latest vendor to jump into the field with its as-a-service offering

    Analysis Startup QuSecure will this week introduce a service aimed at addressing how to safeguard cybersecurity once quantum computing renders current public key encryption technologies vulnerable.

    It's unclear when quantum computers will easily crack classical crypto – estimates range from three to five years to never – but conventional wisdom is that now's the time to start preparing to ensure data remains encrypted.

    A growing list of established vendors like IBM and Google and smaller startups – Quantum Xchange and Quantinuum, among others – have worked on this for several years. QuSecure, which is launching this week after three years in stealth mode, will offer a fully managed service approach with QuProtect, which is designed to not only secure data now against conventional threats but also against future attacks from nation-states and bad actors leveraging quantum systems.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022