mmO2 hikes 3G speeds

On the Isle of Man, admittedly...


mmO2 says improvements to its Isle of Man 3G network will make it three times faster than rival services from Vodafone and 3.

Due to go live next summer the network uses HSDPA (high-speed downlink packet access) technology and IMS(Internet Protocol Multimedia services).

But the extra speed is available only through data cards in laptops - not through handsets - which won't be available until the second half of 2006. A spokesman for mmO2 said: "Lucent are the only current provider of this technology which in simple terms is a software upgrade to the base stations."

The network will be built by Lucent and will provide speeds of 3.6 Megabits per second at launch but can support speeds of up to 14.4Mbps. At launch customers will be able to send a 5Mbyte video clip in less than 30 seconds.

Lucent is providing equipment developed by Bell Labs as well as Flexent OneBTS base stations, Radio Network Controller and UMTS kit including Serving GPRS Support Node and Gateway GPRS Support Node.

mmO2 offers 3G services for business customers in Germany and will launch in Ireland and the UK early next year.

Press release here. ®

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