Scientology spokesman confirms Xenu story

It's all true after all


A Scientology spokesman has confirmed that Scientologists believe that mankind's problems stem from brainwashed alien soul remnants created millions of years ago by genocidal alien overlord Xenu. The admission follows years of attempts to dismiss the story, first leaked by defectors, as anti-church propaganda.

In an interview with KESQ News Channel 3, Scientology spokesman Tommy Davis was quizzed over the Xenu story, which leaked papers show is revealed to senior Scientologists as part of their induction to "Operating Thetan Level III". Davis at first denied the story, as he had done in the past.

However, when the KESQ reporter read from a book written by Scientology founder L Ron Hubbard which refers to the Xenu story, Davis admitted that the story is authentic, albeit confidential and restricted. He then laid into KESQ reporter Nathan Baca, accusing him of "forwarding an agenda of hate".

The Xenu story has previously been routinely denied by senior Scientologists, including actor Tom Cruise (story here). The Church of Scientology has long used copyright and trade secrecy laws in legal actions designed to suppress the tale.

According to anti-Scientology protest group Anonymous, a leaked recording shows Scientology founder Hubbard giving a lecture on OT III. A handwritten document summarising the Xenu story, in Hubbard's own handwriting, has also turned up, it adds.

A transcript of the OCIII procedure can be found on Wikileaks here and a collection of Scientology documents - which, true to form the Church tried to supress - can be found on Wikileaks here.

Scientologist doctrine suggests that exposure to the fantastical Xenu story before the completion of numerous preparatory stages might result in pneumonia or even death. Scientologists pay an estimated $350,000 to reach OT III.

A core doctrine of Scientology belief is that freeing the human body of attachment to alien soul remnants, or Thetans, created by Xenu when he kidnapped millions and brought them to earth for a fiery execution, is key to achieving spiritual progress and relief from worries. ®

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