Teen's mobe loaded with X-rated smut

CpW repair job ends in couples on the job


An 18-year-old Coventry lass has been left "angry", "horrified", "shocked" and "deeply traumatised" after Carphone Warehouse returned her repaired mobile loaded with hardcore porn.

Lauren Kennedy, 18, packed off her Nokia for remedial treatment earlier this month when "it kept cutting out during phone calls", the Sun explains.

When it came back, it boasted "ten videos ranging from five to ten minutes" featuring "saucy romps, group sex and women touching themselves". Also on offer were "images of women in sexy undies", which were like the vids transferred to the device via Bluetooth.

Shaken student Lauren said: "I think it's revolting that somebody has had their filthy paws all over my mobile phone. The people had recorded themselves doing everything.

"There were clips of couples having sex in the toilet, in the bathroom and having group sex in the bedroom. You can only see the women and not the person who's recording it, but you can hear him egging them on in a sleazy voice."

To add to the outrage, a call to Carphone Warehouse's customer services earned Kennedy a paltry 10 quid compensation offer. She indignated: "I felt sick when I saw the videos and was even more insulted when they offered just £10 in compensation. I told them they were incredibly lucky I wasn't a really young kid. For all they know I could be eight or nine years old.

"What if one of my two younger brothers had turned the phone on and found those images? It makes me feel sick."

A Carphone Warehouse spokesman offered: "We are investigating this issue as a matter of urgency. We apologise to Lauren Kennedy and her family for any offence that may have been caused and have replaced the phone with a brand new BlackBerry Curve."

Regular readers will doubtless be reminded of the 2008 Oz mobe porn scandal, in which Dick Smith Electronics punted some quality pre-loaded filth to a Cairns university student, including snaps of "a woman naked from the waist down lying on a bed performing a sex act, a man holding his penis and consecutive shots of the woman in her bra and pulling her pants down".

The company unwisely declined to offer the poor girl adequate recompense for the trauma, and she quickly threatened to eBay it - complete with the offending material. ®

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