IT guy answers daughter's Facebook rant by shooting her laptop

'You can have a new one when you buy one'


Vid An angry American IT pro has responded to a rude Facebook post from his daughter by riddling her laptop with a fusillade of bullets and posting video of the shooting on YouTube.

Here it is, with the incensed dad leading in by reading out the offending Facebook post and offering a few points in response before emptying his .45 – apparently loaded with "exploding hollow point rounds"* – into his daughter's machine.

Viewers will note that the testy IT-guy's daughter had seemingly blocked her Facebook diatribe from being viewed by her parents, despite the fact that it was notionally addressed to them. Not only did she show an undoubtedly misguided faith in Facebook's privacy defences (all the more unwise, as her father points out, when one has a dad who works in tech), the obstreperous teen also showed a very poor awareness of cliche, leading off her remarks with the statement that she is not her parents' slave.

For those preferring a summary to audio, the oppressed teen seemingly objected to doing such chores as cleaning, emptying the dishwasher and making her bed, and felt that her parents should pay her for doing these things rather than nagging her to get a job. The young lady added that "we have a cleaning lady for a reason", and also suggested that her parents should get off their fat asses and pour their own coffee.

Her dad, who apparently discovered these thoughts while upgrading his daughter's machine, begs to differ before moving on to the aforementioned enpopment of caps in the hapless laptop. Piling on the punishments, he adds that he expects to bill his daughter both for the software added to the machine and for the cost of the bullets expended in destroying it.

"When you're not grounded again," he adds, "whatever year that turns out to be, you can have a new computer. When you buy one."

The online community seemed broadly to stand behind the enraged, pistol-packing IT dad, with the vid standing at well over 36,000 likes compared to just 3,000 dislikes as of publication of this article. ®

Bootnote

*From the vid one would say probably just hollowpoint. It's pretty common to hear various kinds of expanding/dum-dum rounds (previous Reg coverage here) described as "explosive" or "exploding" but they almost never contain an actual explosive charge in the projectile itself (as opposed to the propellant charge in the cartridge which blows the bullet out of the gun).

Technically for anti-materiel work, hollowpoints wouldn't normally be the choice - though of course our gun-fancying readers may differ on this point, it's what comment threads are for - but in this case the job seems to have been done in a workmanlike fashion.

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