Microsoft gives away more data with SkyDrive upgrade

'Box offers 10GB for free? Cute. Here's 25GB'


Microsoft has dramatically increased the default storage space available for customers of its SkyDrive Pro service.

The upgrades were announced by Microsoft on Tuesday and see Redmond increase the overall storage space available for each user from 7GB to 25GB, and add other features as well.

SkyDrive Pro is a store 'n' sync product that can chuck stuff into the cloud and bring it back down. Besides being stored in a secure cloud service, the technology also lets users bring a copy down onto their local machine.

In addition, the company announced that admins can now increase SkyDrive Pro storage up to 50GB and 100GB for individuals with, dare we say it, big data needs. Additional storage beyond the default costs $0.20 per gigabyte per month.

Under the new system, the maximum number of documents a person can sync using the SkyDrive Pro Sync client is now 20,000 for personal documents, or 5,000 for team sites.

The changes to SkyDrive Pro follow Microsoft rival Box increasing the storage amount available in its free tier from 5GB to 10GB. However, as SkyDrive Pro is tied directly to both Office 365 and Sharepoint 2013, it has some additional Microsoft-specific features that Box lacks. ®

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