You'e yping i wong: macOS Catalina stops Twitter desktop app from accepting B, L, M, R, and T in passwords

Oher sofwae ikey hi y egession in uggy opeaing syse


Twitter says a bug in macOS 10.15.1 aka Catalina stops users of the social network's desktop Mac app from entering certain letters in account password fields.

When attempting to type their passwords into the application to log in, some characters are ignored, specifically 'b', 'l', 'm', 'r', and 't'. That would make it impossible to submit passwords using those keys to sign into Twitter accounts; pass phrases can be cut'n'pasted just fine.

According to Twitter in-house developer Nolan O'Brien, these particular keypresses are gobbled up by a regression associated with the operating system's shortcut support. Normally, users can press those aforementioned keys as shortcuts within the app to perform specific actions, such as 't' to open a box to compose a new tweet.

Something changed within macOS to capture those shortcut keys, rather than pass them to the password field in the user interface as expected. So, in other words, when you press a shortcut key in Twitter when entering an account password, the keypress is ignored in that context rather than handled as a legit password keypress.

Other programs may also be similarly affected.

Here's how O'Brien put it, referring to Apple's UIKit API:

And here's a video of the regression in action:

The two options presented to would-be LibreOffice users: Cancel or Move to bin

Not LibreOffice too? Beloved open-source suite latest to fall victim to the curse of Catalina

READ MORE

There's no word yet on when a patch for the issue might be out. Apple did not respond to a request for comment. Chalk this up as another potential weird bug of the week.

This is one of several headaches that Mac fans who opted to update to Catalina are having to deal with in the early days of Apple's latest OS edition.

Developers have lamented the sorry quality of the release, in some cases even likening it to Windows Vista, while users have reported a number of performance and stability bugs introduced by the update.

Those who have not yet updated to macOS 10.15 may want to hold off for a bit longer while both Cupertino and third-party devs iron out most of the wrinkles in the platform. ®

PS: Apple's fiscal 2019 full-year financial numbers were out on Wednesday: $55bn profit, down seven per cent year-on-year, off $260bn in sales, down two per cent, in the 12 months to calendar September 28.


Other stories you might like

  • A peek into Gigabyte's GPU Arm for AI, HPC shops
    High-performance platform choices are going beyond the ubiquitous x86 standard

    Arm-based servers continue to gain momentum with Gigabyte Technology introducing a system based on Ampere's Altra processors paired with Nvidia A100 GPUs, aimed at demanding workloads such as AI training and high-performance compute (HPC) applications.

    The G492-PD0 runs either an Ampere Altra or Altra Max processor, the latter delivering 128 64-bit cores that are compatible with the Armv8.2 architecture.

    It supports 16 DDR4 DIMM slots, which would be enough space for up to 4TB of memory if all slots were filled with 256GB memory modules. The chassis also has space for no fewer than eight Nvidia A100 GPUs, which would make for a costly but very powerful system for those workloads that benefit from GPU acceleration.

    Continue reading
  • GitLab version 15 goes big on visibility and observability
    GitOps fans can take a spin on the free tier for pull-based deployment

    One-stop DevOps shop GitLab has announced version 15 of its platform, hot on the heels of pull-based GitOps turning up on the platform's free tier.

    Version 15.0 marks the arrival of GitLab's next major iteration and attention this time around has turned to visibility and observability – hardly surprising considering the acquisition of OpsTrace as 2021 drew to a close, as well as workflow automation, security and compliance.

    GitLab puts out monthly releases –  hitting 15.1 on June 22 –  and we spoke to the company's senior director of Product, Kenny Johnston, at the recent Kubecon EU event, about what will be added to version 15 as time goes by. During a chat with the company's senior director of Product, Kenny Johnston, at the recent Kubecon EU event, The Register was told that this was more where dollars were being invested into the product.

    Continue reading
  • To multicloud, or not: Former PayPal head engineer weighs in
    Not everyone needs it, but those who do need to consider 3 things, says Asim Razzaq

    The push is on to get every enterprise thinking they're missing out on the next big thing if they don't adopt a multicloud strategy.

    That shove in the multicloud direction appears to be working. More than 75 percent of businesses are now using multiple cloud providers, according to Gartner. That includes some big companies, like Boeing, which recently chose to spread its bets across AWS, Google Cloud and Azure as it continues to eliminate old legacy systems. 

    There are plenty of reasons to choose to go with multiple cloud providers, but Asim Razzaq, CEO and founder at cloud cost management company Yotascale, told The Register that choosing whether or not to invest in a multicloud architecture all comes down to three things: How many different compute needs a business has, budget, and the need for redundancy. 

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022