HPE Greenlake to power Taeknizon private cloud expansion in UAE

Isn't this the definition of a middle man?


Why build a cloud datacenter yourself, when you can rent one from Hewlett Packard Enterprise? It may seem unorthodox, but That’s exactly the approach Singapore-based private cloud provider Taeknizon is using to extend its private cloud offering to the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

Founded in 2012, Taeknizon offers a menagerie of services ranging from IoT, robotics, and AI to colocation and private cloud services, primarily in the Middle East and Asia. The company’s latest expansion in the UAE will see it lean on HPE GreenLake’s anything-as-a-service (XaaS) platform to meet growing demand from small-to-midsize enterprises for cloud services in the region.

“Today, 94% of companies operating in the UAE are SMEs," Ahmad AlKhallafi, UAE managing director at HPE, said in a statement. "Taeknizon’s as-a-service model caters to the requirements of SMEs and aligns with our vision to empower youth and the local startup community.”

Taeknizon already offers subscription infrastructure, backup, disaster recovery, and security services under its private cloud product line. The biz claims Greenlake provides a cost-effective means to extend these services to new markets, like the UAE.

As usage increases, preconfigured systems or racks can be shipped and deployed to maintain adequate capacity,if the contract is fulfilled. In some cases, GreenLake can even unlock additional CPU resources laying dormant in already-deployed systems.

However, GreenLake isn’t the datacenter equivalent of renting a cable box, and HPE has gone to great pains to offer a full suite of cloud functionality. GreenLake now offers 50 services, including a recently announced block storage service.

GreenLake expands reach

The platform has gained steady momentum over the last few years as HPE has brought a larger portion of its portfolio under the Greenlake umbrella.

The Taeknizon collaboration marks a small victory for the OEM, which has struggled to sell its more than 80,000 global partners on the model. Late last year, the company admitted that just 900 partners had agreed to resell the platform.

However, the company’s fortunes in this department may be changing. On its Q2 earnings call earlier this month, the company said the number resellers and orders relating GreenLake products had doubled since Q1.

It’s unclear how much of that can be attributed to a March decision to open the platform to distributors Arrow Electronics, Ingram Micro, ALSO Group and TD Synnex, which HPE claimed would expand GreenLake’s reach to 100,000 partners. ®

Broader topics


Other stories you might like

  • HPE thinks your next GreenLake deploy will be a private cloud
    Plus: IT giant expands relationship with Red Hat and SUSE, tackles hybrid data fabrics

    Extending a public-cloud-like experience to on-prem datacenters has long been a promise of HPE's GreenLake anything-as-a-service (XaaS) platform. At HPE Discover this week, the company made good on that promise with the launch of GreenLake for Private Cloud.

    The platform enables customers "to have a cloud in their premises wherever the data is, whether it's at the edge, it's at a colo datacenter, or is at any other location," Vishal Lall, SVP and GM for HPE GreenLake cloud services solutions, said during a press briefing ahead of Discovery.

    Most private clouds up to this point have been custom-built environments strapped together with some automation, he said. "It was somewhat of an improvement over the DIY infrastructure, but it really wasn't private cloud."

    Continue reading
  • Will Lenovo ever think beyond hardware?
    Then again, why develop your own software à la HPE GreenLake when you can use someone else's?

    Analysis Lenovo fancies its TruScale anything-as-a-service (XaaS) platform as a more flexible competitor to HPE GreenLake or Dell Apex. Unlike its rivals, Lenovo doesn't believe it needs to mimic all aspects of the cloud to be successful.

    While subscription services are nothing new for Lenovo, the company only recently consolidated its offerings into a unified XaaS service called TruScale.

    On the surface TruScale ticks most of the XaaS boxes — cloud-like consumption model, subscription pricing — and it works just like you'd expect. Sign up for a certain amount of compute capacity and a short time later a rack full of pre-plumbed compute, storage, and network boxes are delivered to your place of choosing, whether that's a private datacenter, colo, or edge location.

    Continue reading
  • HPE unveils Arm-based ProLiant server for cloud-native workloads
    Looks like it went with Ampere's Altra and Altra Max processors

    Arm has a champion in the shape of HPE, which has added a server powered by the British chip designer's CPU cores to its ProLiant portfolio, aimed at cloud-native workloads for service providers and enterprise customers alike.

    Announced at the IT titan's Discover 2022 conference in Las Vegas, the HPE ProLiant RL300 Gen11 server is the first in a series of such systems powered by Ampere's Altra and Altra Max processors, which feature up to 80 and 128 Arm-designed Neoverse cores, respectively.

    The system is set to be available during Q3 2022, so sometime in the next three months, and is basically an enterprise-grade ProLiant server – but with an Arm processor at its core instead of the more usual Intel Xeon or AMD Epyc X86 chips.

    Continue reading
  • HPE ordered to pay Oracle $30m for Solaris IP infringement
    Years long case closes after three-week jury trial, HPE considering next step

    Hewlett Packard Enterprise must pay Oracle $30 million for copyright infringement after a jury found it guilty of providing customers with Solaris software updates without Big Red's permission.

    The decision, which HPE may contest, is the culmination of a three-week trial in Oakland, California. However, the case was first raised years back when Oracle claimed HPE had offered illegal updates under a scheme devised by software support provider Terix, which settled its case in 2015 for almost $58 million.

    In proceedings at the start of this week, Oracle’s lawyer, Christopher Yeates of Latham & Watkins LLP, pressed the eight-person jury to award his client $72 million for HPE using software not covered by a support contract, and for pinching clients, including Comcast.

    Continue reading
  • Having trouble finding power supplies or server racks? You're not the only one
    Hyperscalers hog the good stuff

    Power and thermal management equipment essential to building datacenters is in short supply, with delays of months on shipments – a situation that's likely to persist well into 2023, Dell'Oro Group reports.

    The analyst firm's latest datacenter physical infrastructure report – which tracks an array of basic but essential components such as uninterruptible power supplies (UPS), thermal management systems, IT racks, and power distribution units – found that manufacturers' shipments accounted for just one to two percent of datacenter physical infrastructure revenue growth during the first quarter.

    "Unit shipments, for the most part, were flat to low single-digit growth," Dell'Oro analyst Lucas Beran told The Register.

    Continue reading
  • Google recasts Anthos with hitch to AWS Outposts
    If at first you don't succeed, change names and try again

    Google Cloud's Anthos on-prem platform is getting a new home under the search giant’s recently announced Google Distributed Cloud (GDC) portfolio, where it will live on as a software-based competitor to AWS Outposts and Microsoft Azure Stack.

    Introduced last fall, GDC enables customers to deploy managed servers and software in private datacenters and at communication service provider or on the edge.

    Its latest update sees Google reposition Anthos on-prem, introduced back in 2020, as the bring-your-own-server edition of GDC. Using the service, customers can extend Google Cloud-style management and services to applications running on-prem.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022